Onboard Photography with a Deceptionist Point of View

On the course early to check the tides aboard Santa Cruz 50 Deception day two of Rolex Big Boat Series. A crew count of eleven is fine for days where under 20-knots prevail. Ahead is Alcatraz Island and to the right is the San Francisco city front.

On the course early to check the tides aboard Santa Cruz 50 Deception day two of Rolex Big Boat Series. A crew count of eleven is fine for days where under 20-knots prevail. Ahead is Alcatraz Island and to the right is the San Francisco city front.

The skipper and crew of Santa Cruz 50 Deception are fairly accustomed to me snapping shots during races. Seen here are moments queuing up and competing in Rolex Big Boat Series San Francisco last September. For kicks, I used a GoPro at the start of the day--set to a wide field of view. Every once in awhile I need to mix it up and experiment with different cameras and angles.

Skipper said he's still a fan of the more traditional photos captured using a DSLR, and imagery with less HDR effecting.

Working with a GoPro is usually hit or miss; some shots are cool, others not so cool. These smaller action cameras lack the quality lens and focus mechanisms, and their lower resolution/lower MP count/smaller sensors do not produce the clarity found in images produced from a DSLR. On the upside though, being waterproof and small in size offer trade-off benefits. All shots were done while holding the camera, but there are plans to try a remote and place the GoPro right under the racers' noses and feet.

Aside from wonky wide angle field of view photography with the GoPro camera, I played with photo retouch to help disguise how lousy the quality can be with these action cameras. Sue works the mainsail on Deception. Here, she's facilitating the start of a gybe by initially handling it. Having the hatch open gave me an uncommon look at things.

Aside from wonky wide angle field of view photography with the GoPro camera, I played with photo retouch to help disguise how lousy the quality can be with these action cameras. Sue works the mainsail on Deception. Here, she's facilitating the start of a gybe by initially handling it. Having the hatch open gave me an uncommon look at things.